No-till: opportunities and challenges for cereal and oilseed growers

The key advantages and disadvantages associated with no-till are detailed in this publication. It also explains how the approach effects crop yields, soil, as well as pest, disease and weed risks.

No-till, also known as direct drilling or zero tillage (conservation tillage in the USA and Australia), means sowing directly into the residues of the previous crop without any prior topsoil loosening.

The objective of no-till is to reduce production costs, while maintaining or increasing yields (with possible added environmental benefits).

This publication provides an overview of the key advantages and disadvantages associated with no-till. It also explains how the approach effects crop yields, soil, as well as pest, disease and weed risks.

Discs versus tine: no-till at AHDB Monitor Farm

No-till farmer knows the drill

Watch no-till enthusiast and Lincolnshire farmer Tony Reynolds talk about his 15 years in no-till. 

Use of autumn nitrogen in no-till farming systems

In 2018, AHDB published findings from a review which concluded ‘there is insufficient evidence to change autumn N guidance for no-tilled crops’. Find out more.

Podcast: Talking tillage

Five farmers talk about their experiences with no-till in our May 2018 edition of our podcast.

The episode finishes with AHDB's Sajjad Awan and Jason Pole discussing recent research into autumn N applications in no-till systems.

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